North American Scorecard George W. Bush Institute

Making the Grade

North America receives a B+ on the new George W. Bush Institute Scorecard, outperforming other trade groups such as the EU, which gets a B, and Mercosur, which only achieved a D-.

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Starbucks Sign in Monaco, La Condamine

The “Starbucks Effect”

Last year, real estate research group Zillow determined that homes located within a quarter-mile of a Starbucks coffee shop increased in value by 96 percent. Starbucks is a premium brand. So is North America. We're lucky in the United States because Canada and Mexico are the kind of neighbors that increase our value.

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Little newborn baby boy

How Some Babies Breathe Easier from Trade

MTTS Asia’s husband and wife co-founders set out to meet a healthcare gap in Vietnam, but they soon found they needed to scale by selling greater volumes in more markets. They are working to overcome non-tariff barriers to break into markets like India where low-cost innovative medical technologies are most needed.

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Totebag

Batik Bags Carry Opportunities for Malaysian Artisans

After moving to Kuala Lumpur from Texas, Amy met Ana, a single mother who was looking for more income to support her family. After discovering that Ana was a skilled seamstress, the two bought some fabric with a batik print, a traditional style that uses an ancient dyeing technique, which Ana then transformed into aprons, tote bags and other crafts.

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cutting-red-tape_fotor

What’s in a Number?

Let’s consider the much-maligned North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Before NAFTA, the average U.S. applied tariff on imports from Mexico was around 4 percent. The average Mexican tariff on U.S. imports was 13 percent. Was it a “bad deal” for the U.S. if both parties reduced tariffs to zero?

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detroit-muscle-red

Made in North America

  The Trade in Value Added (TiVa) Tool we posted on TradeVistas from the World Bank allows you to explore where value is added to products throughout the world. It might lead you to think that value chains work in one direction: parts are added and the product moves to the next supplier to add […]

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Lawnmower

Skirts on Lawnmowers and Other “Non-Tariff” Barriers to Trade

Countries often use a variety of tactics to give their home-grown companies a leg up over foreign competitors, like requiring "skirts" on lawnmowers of competitors. These are non-tariff barriers.

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Man with tablet

The Rise of Global Value Chains (GVCs)

Thanks to technology and policy improvements, modern production is increasingly organized around the set of tasks required to bring a product to market, from invention to final use. These tasks form "value chains" of different firms in different places whose activities are precisely coordinated.

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Politician

What Politicians Get Wrong About U.S. Manufacturing

Politicians critical of trade and globalization often point to the decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs as proof positive of America’s dwindling economic might.

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world-bank-global-value-chain-tool

Connect the Dots

  In the modern global economy, most products are not wholly made in one country. Even the services you buy can be composed of inputs from various countries around the world — like the story of our TradeVistas logo designed by an artist in Indonesia commissioned through a company aggregating design services out of Australia. […]

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