Entries by Anne Kim

Chutes and Ladders: Four Strategies to Help ‘Displaced’ Workers

Every year, between 2 to 4 percent of workers in industrial economies are “displaced” from their jobs. Those most likely to lose their jobs – the very young, the very old, and the less educated – are also the workers least equipped to manage economic upheaval successfully. Even in resilient and growing economies, these workers often need a hand to get back on their feet.

How Rural America Benefits From the H-1B Program

Since its creation in 1990, the U.S. H-1B visa program has enabled American employers to hire highly-skilled foreign workers when native-born talent is in short supply. As many as 1 in 4 physicians in the United States are foreign-trained and they are much more likely than their American counterparts to serve in areas with higher poverty and lower educational levels.

Let’s Talk Turkeys

Americans may be among the world’s most prodigious consumer of turkeys, but turkeys have become an increasingly popular holiday food in Mexico. Ninety percent of the turkeys at those Mexican fiestas will have come from American farms – in part thanks to NAFTA.

Halloween, the Global Holiday

While the commercialization of Halloween might be a made-in-America phenomenon, its popularity wouldn’t be possible without the abundance of affordable consumer goods made available through trade.

The Secret Life of Roads – and the Future of U.S. Jobs

At the end of his four-year apprenticeship, Allen Miller will hold a journeyman’s license in industrial maintenance, an associate’s degree from nearby Germanna Community College, and a certificate in “asphalt technology” issued by the Virginia Asphalt Association. He might be the model for the kind of worker the U.S. economy needs more of to succeed.

A Shortage of Skilled Workers Threatens Manufacturing’s Rebound

U.S. manufacturers will create more than 3 million job openings over the next decade – but two million of these future jobs could go unfilled. “If we’re not able to ensure a skilled workforce and a steady supply of skilled workers for manufacturers in this country, then [companies will] either go out of business or be forced to look elsewhere.” – Gardner Carrick of the Manufacturing Institute