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TradeVistas | trade in dalgona coffee ingredients

Into the Dalgona Coffee Trend? Mmm, Thanks Trade.

Whipping up a Trade Trend The “cloud coffee” phenomenon making the rounds on Instagram and TikTok is a prime example of how ingenious people leverage global trade to bring us ideas and products we never knew we needed, but that we now love. I’m talking about dalgona coffee, sweet caffeinated happiness in a cup. It is made of equal parts instant coffee, sugar and hot water whipped together into a beautiful froth and then spooned on top of your favorite hot or cold milk. This delightful and photogenic confection is *everywhere* on social media. In the spirit of inquiring into the global origins of the products we love, here’s what we found out. Dalgona’s “Honeycomb Toffee” Origins Dalgona coffee isn’t […]

Port of Virginia drives coffee trade in Suffolk VA

Port of Virginia Put Suffolk on the Coffee Map

Suffolk is the most caffeinated city east of the Mississippi thanks to booming coffee trade through the nearby Port of Virginia. Here’s a look at how trade drives economic development in this flourishing coffee cluster.

Japanese-KitKats

Cherry Blossom KitKats, Bubble Tea, and Pocky Sticks: Trade Spreads Asian Twist on Snacks

Cherry blossom, green tea, and red bean are popular flavors in Asia used in a wide variety of snack foods. The core ingredients of some of these snack foods were not native to Asia. But global trade spread access to non-native plants and ingredients, enabling other countries to put their own flavor spin on new products.

Milled spices - garlic, turmeric, paprika, anise, oregano, cardamom. Round of golden spoons on blue wooden table. Top view, close-up

Spicy Trade: U.S. and India Turn Up the Heat

Turmeric is the new “it” spice. While things are golden for trade in turmeric, less can be said for U.S.-India trade relations as a whole. Tensions have been heating up over the past few years, culminating in the recent announcement from the White House that India could soon be terminated from the U.S. Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program.

Salumeria-Italiano_Fotor

La Dolce Vita…Trade Brings Italy’s Delicacies to the North End of Boston

Ethnic neighborhoods across the United States – from Little Havana in Miami to San Francisco’s Chinatown – allow us to experience elements of a culture and cuisine without needing to break out a passport. Read about how trade brings the best of Italy’s food to residents and tourists in Boston’s North End.

Champagne in glasses on restaurant background

Trade Tensions Bubble Beneath the Surface of Your New Years’ Eve Champagne

Champagne is the drink of choice to celebrate many of life’s milestones and one country in particular benefits the most from this tradition: France. The European Union wants to ensure through trade agreements that only sparkling wines produced in the Champagne region of France can be labeled by law as Champagne.

Coffee beans

How Much Would You Pay for a Cup of Kope (Coffee)?

For the two-thirds of Americans who drink at least one cup of coffee per day, it’s nearly impossible to be a true locavore. More than three-quarters of U.S. coffee imports come from just four countries: Brazil, Colombia, Vietnam, and Honduras, countries that have the right climate for growing it.

alcohol, rum, Cuba Libre, cocktail, longdrink, strong drink,

Havana Club With a Twist of Trade

Among the many casualties of the 1958 Cuban revolution was the clear rights to Havana Club rum, which has been tied up in a decades-long trade dispute involving the United States, Cuba, and the European Union.

NAFTA milk

Will the U.S. and Canada Cry Over Spilled Milk in NAFTA?

Production limits and price-setting means Canadian milk drinkers pay significantly more than they would in a free market. Conversely, for certain lucrative and in-demand dairy product ingredients, Canadian dairy boards have set prices at or below international market prices. U.S. and other global dairy farmers have argued this offers Canadian exports an advantage in third markets, while driving global prices and farm receipts down. Will NAFTA 2.0 change any of this?

whiskey

The Sobering Reality of a Tariff War

There is plenty of collateral damage in a tariff war because the one-upmanship spills over beyond the sectors named in the original complaint (steel for example), sweeping in producers like farmers for maximum political effect. The other dirty little secret in tariff wars is that they provide cover for governments to protect the producers of products facing normal market competition. That’s what might just be motivating our closest trading partners to put American whiskey on their lists for tariff retaliation.