Oil tank in harbor

Energizing U.S. Oil and Gas Exports to China

Against a backdrop of high profile trade and investment disputes between the United States and China, American hydrocarbon exports to China are booming. U.S. energy commodity exports to China went from $2.6 billion in 2016 to $8.6 billion in 2017.

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On Whose Turf Will the Trade War Be Fought?

While President Trump believes China's large trade surplus shifts the balance of power in a tariff war to the United States, China can respond by punishing U.S. affiliates, who are sitting ducks in a trade war.

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The Fall 2017 FX Report: Reading Between the Lines

Twice a year, the U.S. Treasury Department issues a report required by Congress that assesses the foreign exchange policies of our major trading partners. Our experts break down the key take-aways from the latest FX Report.

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The Best Way to Reduce the Deficit is to Grow Mexico’s Economy

A NAFTA negotiation could address the “microeconomic” factors that affect trade flows would increase the level of trade between the United States and Mexico and make U.S. consumers better off, but it wouldn't have much effect on the balance of trade. On the other hand, economic growth in Mexico would achieve that effect by stimulating demand for more U.S. products.

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A Deficit of Good Trade Data

In 2016, the United States ran a trade deficit of $500.6 billion. If President Trump wanted to reduce the U.S. deficit with Mexico or China, all he has to do is change the way we count it.

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Baseball Field Scoreboard

Don’t Use the Trade Deficit to Keep Score

Americans like to play to win. When it comes to international trade, however, we shouldn't use the size and trend of the national trade deficit as a way of scoring trade policy. It's like using the size of players' salaries to evaluate whether you had a winning season.

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Imports are Part of America’s Secret Sauce

Sure, it’s good when American companies export goods and services to the world. But imports make many American-made products more competitive as well as enriching our lives as consumers - they are part of the secret sauce of what makes our economy work so well.

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What’s in a Number?

Let’s consider the much-maligned North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Before NAFTA, the average U.S. applied tariff on imports from Mexico was around 4 percent. The average Mexican tariff on U.S. imports was 13 percent. Was it a “bad deal” for the U.S. if both parties reduced tariffs to zero?

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Does Trade Kill Jobs?

Trade agreements aren't the principle factor to blame for the majority of U.S. job losses or the decline in earnings. Many factors that determine total employment.

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