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Invest in People, Not Places

Studying the rise and fall of “company towns,” the lessons are clear. Place-based policies meant to resurrect declining areas are futile. Instead, leaders must not only invest in the people in their communities — they must recognize that policies to promote mobility will pay off.

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Dr. Seuss Helps Us Thrive in the Knowledge Economy

By focusing on better preparing youth for employment in the knowledge economy, we can address long-term labor market shortfalls, improve lifetime earning potential, and contribute significantly to national productivity and global competitiveness. Where does it all begin? With teaching our kids to read well.

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Driving Demand

One result of the widespread acceptance of e-commerce and home delivery is a growing and urgent demand for drivers – at least for now.

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How Rural America Benefits From the H-1B Program

Since its creation in 1990, the U.S. H-1B visa program has enabled American employers to hire highly-skilled foreign workers when native-born talent is in short supply. As many as 1 in 4 physicians in the United States are foreign-trained and they are much more likely than their American counterparts to serve in areas with higher poverty and lower educational levels.

Portrait Of Female Nurse Standing In Hospital Corridor

Why More Students Should Go to College in High School

“Dual enrollment” programs – where students attend both high school and college – are gaining in popularity as college costs soar. It’s a trend that deserves to be embraced and expanded.

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Looking Beyond the Wall: How the U.S. Economy Can Grow Through Immigration

Great companies know that their employees are their most valuable asset. That’s why they compete to attract the best talent. For companies hiring workers in the United States, that talent pool is comprised of both native-born Americans – and immigrants. We are lucky because the United States has always attracted top talent from around the world.

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A New Chapter for Labor in NAFTA

North America’s global competitive advantage depends in large measure on maintaining a strong foundation of workforce talent. But employers with North American manufacturing and supply chains are concerned about labor market shortfalls, particularly for frontline jobs in advanced manufacturing and logistics.

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The Secret Life of Roads – and the Future of U.S. Jobs

At the end of his four-year apprenticeship, Allen Miller will hold a journeyman’s license in industrial maintenance, an associate’s degree from nearby Germanna Community College, and a certificate in “asphalt technology” issued by the Virginia Asphalt Association. He might be the model for the kind of worker the U.S. economy needs more of to succeed.

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THE METALWORKING GROUP

“In a typical year, I’d be looking at maybe buying more equipment or investing in the business. And now I don’t know what things are going to look like six months from now.”

-Mike Schmitt, CEO

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BRINLY-HARDY COMPANY

“Our U.S. manufacturing jobs and our 179-year history should not be considered acceptable collateral damage.”

-Jane Hardy, CEO