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How Rural America Benefits From the H-1B Program

Since its creation in 1990, the U.S. H-1B visa program has enabled American employers to hire highly-skilled foreign workers when native-born talent is in short supply. As many as 1 in 4 physicians in the United States are foreign-trained and they are much more likely than their American counterparts to serve in areas with higher poverty and lower educational levels.

Portrait Of Female Nurse Standing In Hospital Corridor

Why More Students Should Go to College in High School

“Dual enrollment” programs – where students attend both high school and college – are gaining in popularity as college costs soar. It’s a trend that deserves to be embraced and expanded.

Giant Picnic

Looking Beyond the Wall: How the U.S. Economy Can Grow Through Immigration

Great companies know that their employees are their most valuable asset. That’s why they compete to attract the best talent. For companies hiring workers in the United States, that talent pool is comprised of both native-born Americans – and immigrants. We are lucky because the United States has always attracted top talent from around the world.

Worker grinding a metal plate

A New Chapter for Labor in NAFTA

North America’s global competitive advantage depends in large measure on maintaining a strong foundation of workforce talent. But employers with North American manufacturing and supply chains are concerned about labor market shortfalls, particularly for frontline jobs in advanced manufacturing and logistics.

The workers and the asphalting machines

The Secret Life of Roads – and the Future of U.S. Jobs

At the end of his four-year apprenticeship, Allen Miller will hold a journeyman’s license in industrial maintenance, an associate’s degree from nearby Germanna Community College, and a certificate in “asphalt technology” issued by the Virginia Asphalt Association. He might be the model for the kind of worker the U.S. economy needs more of to succeed.

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THE METALWORKING GROUP

“In a typical year, I’d be looking at maybe buying more equipment or investing in the business. And now I don’t know what things are going to look like six months from now.”

-Mike Schmitt, CEO

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BRINLY-HARDY COMPANY

“Our U.S. manufacturing jobs and our 179-year history should not be considered acceptable collateral damage.”

-Jane Hardy, CEO

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MID-CONTINENT NAIL CORPORATION

“I’m fighting for our 500 jobs and myself.”

-Chris Pratt, General Manager

Retro robot reading a book. Isolated. Contains clipping path

Less-Educated Men Hit Hard by Technological Shift in Job Market

American workers are increasingly anxious about robots and automation replacing them in their jobs. The underlying dynamic is that jobs are changing because of automation, not disappearing. That’s not a concern in and of itself. The concern is that not everyone is on good footing to adjust.

Men work on the old factory for the installation

A Shortage of Skilled Workers Threatens Manufacturing’s Rebound

U.S. manufacturers will create more than 3 million job openings over the next decade – but two million of these future jobs could go unfilled. “If we’re not able to ensure a skilled workforce and a steady supply of skilled workers for manufacturers in this country, then [companies will] either go out of business or be forced to look elsewhere.” – Gardner Carrick of the Manufacturing Institute