TradeVistas | murder hornet is invasive alien species

Invasive Alien Species are Stowaways in Global Trade

Murder hornets arrived on container ships, posing a threat to local honeybees that pollinate food we trade. Invasive alien species are a reminder that increased trade volume, changes in trade routes, and the expansion of airport and seaport capacity around the world means having to deal with the unwelcome stowaways in global trade.

TradeVistas | air cargo is critical trade infrastructure

Global Cargo is Leaving on a Jet Plane

Air cargo (sometimes carried by passenger flight) is critical infrastructure that is moving medical supplies where they are needed most to fight the coronavirus.

China Belt Road Initiative | TradeVistas

China Seeks to Redraw the Global Trade Map

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is laying the groundwork for new trade routes with infrastructure investments that span 138 countries. If successful, BRI means all roads will lead back to Beijing. Read the basics about BRI – and what questions remain.

Port of Virginia drives coffee trade in Suffolk VA

Port of Virginia Put Suffolk on the Coffee Map

Suffolk is the most caffeinated city east of the Mississippi thanks to booming coffee trade through the nearby Port of Virginia. Here’s a look at how trade drives economic development in this flourishing coffee cluster.

TradeVistas | Corruption is Costly “Hidden” Tariff

Corruption is a Costly “Hidden” Tariff

Corruption is one of the most costly non-tariff barriers in global trade. The trouble is, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Tackling corruption to promote legitimate trade would have positive impacts on millions around the world. An OECD report suggests a mix of approaches.

Businessman hands searching unfinished documents stacks of paper files on office desk for report papers, piles of sheet achieves with clips on table, Document is written, drawn,presented.

Blockchain Could Replace Mounds of Paper at the Border

Smoother and faster customs procedures could boost global trade volumes and economic output. Blockchain is a promising technology that, if widely adopted by shippers and customs agencies, could reduce the current mounds of paperwork and costs associated with import and export licenses, cargo and shipping documents, and customs declarations.

Factory worker using application on mobile smartphone to operate automation for modern trade. Checking order in large warehouse. Import and export the shipping cargo.

Small and Medium-Sized Global Traders Are Banking on Blockchain

80 percent of all global trade is transacted through third-party lenders and cargo insurers, but the process is complex, can be costly and many banks find it too risky to support small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Blockchain has the potential to increase transparency, speed and accuracy in assessing risk across the trade finance process, which in turn could expand the supply of credit available for SMEs.

Ensuring all legal customs rules are met

Is the Cargo Ship Sailing on New Tariffs?

There are rough waters ahead for shippers dealing with the tariff uncertainties. The prospect of tariff hikes is incentivizing companies to lock in better shipping prices now. But many retailers are competing just to find space for their goods on an ocean carrier, and the shipment surge has resulted in massive congestion at ports and warehouses.

Provenance.org screenshot as feature image

Where Have You Been? Blockchain for Tracking Goods in Trade

Blockchain technologies will play an increasing role in international trade. Using blockchain to track the origins of raw materials and follow domestic and international supply chains can help meet the increasing demand for consumer information about globally produced goods, providing more transparency and accuracy about a product’s long journey to the store.

pile-of-old-letters-envelopes-post-stamps-picture-id655543788

The Secret Postal Organization You Never Heard Of (Until Last Week)

Jayme Smaldone noticed that knockoffs of his Mighty Mug were selling on e-Bay for very cheap and included free shipping. But for his company, the cost was about $6.30 to ship the same (original) mug from their New Jersey warehouse to a U.S. location, even one across the street. How could that be?