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Global Arms Trade Highest Since End of Cold War

After a decade of steady increase, the volume of arms trade by 2012 had reached levels not seen since the end of the Cold War. Trade in conventional arms and dual-use goods and technologies is regulated through policies that include government defense procurement regulations, national export control licensing regimes and embargoes.

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Wave of Global Sand Trade May Be Depleting Beaches

Sand is a critical component in many of the products we depend on every day. Demand for sand is expected to increase in the coming years, especially in developing countries faced with increasing populations, urbanization and economic growth. But despite its importance worldwide, sand is one of the least regulated resources today.

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Global Trade in Cannabis Could Bloom, Boosting U.S. Hemp Production

CBD is popping up in all types of new products from infused food and drink, to dietary supplements, lotions, oils, cosmetics and even pet treats. Passage of the 2018 Farm Bill may open up new avenues for U.S. farmers looking to cash in on growing demand for hemp-derived products, like trendy CBD. But U.S. farmers will have some catching up to do to compete in the global cannabis market.

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Child Labor Still a Scourge in Commonly Traded Goods

An estimated 152 million children in the world today are in child labor. Provisions on labor issues have proliferated in trade agreements since NAFTA was implemented. But child labor is a complex problem requiring complex and situational solutions. Only concerted action in local communities and throughout global supply chains will make widespread and demonstrable improvements to lives of the millions of children who are mainly not included in the scope of a trade agreement.

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How Criminals Move Money Through Global Trade

As global trade grows and increases in complexity, trade-based money laundering has become the weakest link in anti-money laundering initiatives. Banks and government officials are strengthening international collaboration to crack down on criminals who hide and launder their dirty money in global trade transactions.

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Breaking Bad Trade: Fentanyl from China

There are some in the United States who are frustrated with the administration’s willingness to toss out the traditional trade policy playbook, but if trade talks over soybeans and intellectual property protections can be leveraged to address illicit trade in deadly fentanyl, we can all get on board with that.

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When a Rose Isn’t Just a Rose: How Trade Policy Was Used to Fight Drugs from Colombia

Americans will give each other 200 million roses over the Valentine season. The majority were grown in Colombia. How did this come to be? For decades, U.S. Government trade, development, and drug eradication policies were designed to move South American growers away from cultivating the coca plant used to make cocaine by substituting commercially profitable production of cut flowers.

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Beyond Tariffs: China Could Retaliate Through Cybersecurity

China’s cybersecurity law can be used as a form of “backdoor” trade retaliation to hurt U.S. firms in China.

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It’s Engagement Season, a Shining Moment for Trade

Forty percent of American marriage proposals happen between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day. Nothing is more synonymous with an engagement than a sparkling diamond ring. Happy couples have international trade to thank for their symbol of commitment: the United States imports 99 percent of its gemstones from other countries.

North Korea-China Trade Ties: North Korea’s Life Jacket is Becoming China’s Straight Jacket

The North Korean regime continues to amass missile and nuclear technologies, through a combination of global licit and illicit transactions. North Korea trades for currency, for fuel, and for military materiel to preserve its power. Will expanded sanctions choke off revenue for weapons programs, or will continued trade ties with China throw North Korea a lifeline?